Home Join ABA About As Advertise with us! Search Site Map
BOATING MAGAZINE NOW INCLUDED WITH PAID ABA MEMBERSHIP. JOIN TODAY!
Shape boat
 

How to Cast Your Bait to the Exact Same Spot Every Time

by Steve Kempson

As a Carp specimen hunter I have fished many well known venues and being able to cast to the exact same spot every time is essential if you are going to succeed in catching that big one. There is no point spoding out 10lb of bait all over the lake and then casting your hook baits yards from where you need to be, there is a sure fire way to get your spod bait and hook bait in exactly the same spot every single time, when a friend of mine showed me this technique my catch rate improved dramatically.

Let me give you a scenario that I am sure you have all come across. You arrive at the lake and you pick you peg, the lake is well known for weed and before you can start to fish you have to find a clear area which you can spod out to and cast your hook baits to. I keep this simple, I setup one rod and cast to an area that I like the look of, before you do this pick a specific feature on the far bank, could be a tree, building or set of lily pads, anything will do, this will be your casting line, you will always aim for this line. At this point I have no rig attached just my weight. I then retrieve the weight by very slowly pulling the rod towards me, you will easily feel the weight pulling through the weed, reel in the slack line and pull the rod backwards again, when you find a clear spot you will feel the difference as the weight moves freely across the bottom, this is the weed free area, stop pulling, this is the spot you want!

Now, you need to be able to cast to this exact spot every time, accuracy is key to your success. This is what we do now, you have your weight in the clear, weed free area, don't move it, simply get some electrical tape and put a small piece at the end of your rod tip, just wrap the tape around the line and trim off, this gives you a marker on line, so when you recast using the feature on the far bank you picked earlier you simply reel the line in until you can see that tape at the end of the rod tip, now you have your bait in exactly the same spot and distance every time you cast out!

Now do the same for your second rod, use the same method and you have two rods that you can cast out to a clear area in exactly the same spot every time!

As you probably already know Carp fishing requires lots of bait, especially if you are on a long session and fishing through the night. You have to be able to spod your free baits out to this exact spot where your hook baits are going to be, so how do we do this? This is how.

You already have your line of cast, remember we picked the features on the far bank? So we use the same features, that way we know we have the correct line, but how are we going to get the distance right for the spod rod, we have no tape on the line, this is what we do. Get one of the bait rods with the tape on the line, put your reel on free spin or take the bail arm off and walk up the bank with the end of the line in your hand, when you get to the tape at the end of the rod tip stop, this is the correct distance, lay the line on the ground, it will stay there as you have your weight attached. Now simply get the spod rod and do the same, walk up the bank to where you left the other line, hen you get there, don't put tape on the spod rod line just go back to the reel and clip the line up on the reel, most reels have line clips!

Now you can cast the spod rod out and it will hit the line clip and exactly the right distance, how easy is that!.

I hope you enjoyed this tip, it has worked wonders for me, you can always email me if you need any further help at the address below, tight lines and remember accuracy is critical to your fishing success.

Steve Kempson
email - L.kempson@btinternet.com
Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Steve_Kempson

 
 
The American Boating Association
PO Box 690
New Market, MD 21774
Tel: 614-497-4088

Office hours M - F, 8:30am - 5:00pm EST
Our Privacy Policy
American Boating Association 2015
Background